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The ABCs of Dealing With Domestic Violence

Domestic violence was a part of my family's life for years. When I made the decision to leave with my children, I had to rely on the law to provide the protection we needed. Sometimes, the system does not work as fast as we want. I soon learned that going at it alone without any guidance caused significant delays. I created this blog to help others who are seeking legal means to deal with an abusive ex. By making the right moves, it is possible to get the necessary protections in place so that you can also live a happier and healthier life.

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The ABCs of Dealing With Domestic Violence

Is It Possible To Qualify For SSA Disability Benefits Due To Lead Poisoning When You Were A Child?

by Gina Hill

Is it possible to qualify for Social Security disability benefits based on the lingering effects of lead poisoning? Maybe. If you suffered lead poisoning as a child, this is what you should know.

Lead poisoning usually results from repeated exposure.

Lead is a toxic metal that's present in a lot of things around us, including imported toys, costume jewelry, water, old paint, and old pipes. It can even be in the dust you are breathing or in the soil around your home, depending on whether or not the soil was contaminated over the years by building materials and other lead sources.

It's rare to ingest a large dose of lead at once -- most of the time, the poisoning is gradual. Children are especially susceptible to lead poisoning because it takes less of the material to damage their small bodies. They also are more likely to swallow paint chips, play in contaminated dirt, and put their mouths on lead jewelry or toys.

Lifelong problems can result from childhood lead exposure.

Once lead poisoning is discovered, the source of the lead can usually be determined and eliminated. However, even once the amount of lead in the exposed person's body returns to normal levels, there can be lasting developmental and neurological damage.

Symptoms of lead poisoning include:

  • abdominal pain and vomiting 
  • muscular weakness 
  • seizures 
  • anemia 
  • developmental delays 
  • speech disorders 
  • hyperactivity and impulse control problems 
  • problems with fine or gross motor coordination 
  • irritability and violent behavior 
  • learning disabilities and lowered I.Q. 
  • memory problems
  • poor academic performance

If you suffered from lead poisoning as a child, your adaptive skills as an adult may also suffer to the point where you have difficulty communicating with others, using appropriate logic, and a general inability to function well in society.

The symptoms of lead poisoning can qualify you for disability benefits.

Once neurological and developmental damage has occurred due to lead poisoning, the damage can't be undone. While Social Security doesn't consider lead poisoning itself to be enough to qualify you for disability, the symptoms you still suffer can lead to your approval for benefits.

When you apply for disability benefits due to lead poisoning, you want to provide as much evidence as you can of your chronic problems:

  • medical records which document the lead poisoning as a child
  • medical records of any problems you still experience as an adult, such as muscle weakness, severe fatigue, anemia, paralysis, hand tremors, and seizures
  • school records, including report cards and any documentation of special services that you received, including speech or physical therapy
  • psychological reports, including I.Q. testing
  • work history, including records showing that you were unable to keep pace with others doing the same job
  • criminal history, especially if it relates to impulse control or problems getting along with others, such as a record of assault and battery charges

It can be difficult to gather the evidence you need, especially if you haven't had much access to medical care or have problems concentrating. If you need assistance, contact an attorney, like those at Allison Tyler Attorney, in your area about filing for benefits.

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